Bonn Challenge: Central Africa Countries to restore 34,56 million hectares of forest in species-rich Congo Basin

 

 

For more Information, please consult the following PDF Documents:

Article Bonn Challenge-Fr.pdf (261.9 KiB)

 bonn challenge -Excel.pdf (129.4 KiB)

 

 

Bonn Challenge in Central Africa

 

CBFP Facilitation

 

Bonn Challenge: Central Africa Countries to restore 34,56 million hectares of forest in species-rich Congo Basin

 

Bonn Challenge - Pledges in Central Africa: Committed -  Economic benefits - climate benefits - Blogs and Media Links - How far we've come in Central Africa…

 

 

Pledges - Commitments

 

The pledges and the total amount of land committed by countries in Central Africa under the Bonn Challenge to over 34,56 million hectares

 

 

Potential benefits for Central Africa

What are the benefits of restoration?

 

Water - Health -  Economic – Food – Environmental - Fuel

 

 

The Potential benefits for Central Africa are classify in two categories: Economics and climates                

  • The Share of Central Africa - Economic activity: 48,424 million USD

 

  • Climate benefit: 66 GtCO2 sequestered

 

 

 

Bonn Challenge - Pledges in Central Africa: Committed -  Economic benefits - climate benefits - Blogs and Media Links

 

Country 

 

 

Committed

 

Potential benefits

 

 

Blogs and Media

 

Economic benefits

 

Climate benefits

 

 

 

Cameroon

 

 

2017: 12.06 million hectares by 2030

 

 

 

 

 

3,787 million USD

 

 

 

 

 

 

1.14 GtCO2 sequestered

 

 

 

Cameroon to restore 12 million hectares of forest in species-rich Congo Basin

Restoration commitments from Africa push the Bonn Challenge beyond 100 million hectares

Kigali Declaration on Forest Landscape Restoration in Africa

 

Central African Republic

2016: 1 million hectares by 2020 2016 2.5 million hectares by 2030 = 3.5 million hectares

 

 

1,099 million USD

 

 

0.33 GtCO2 sequestered

 

 

Restoration commitments from Africa push the Bonn Challenge beyond 100 million hectares

 

Kigali Declaration on Forest Landscape Restoration in Africa

 

Chad

 

 

2017:  5 million hectares by 2030

 

 

Highlighted benefits

Water & Environmental

Chad announces 5 million hectare restoration commitment to the Bonn Challenge

 

1,884 million USD

 

0,57 GtCO2 sequestered

Democratic Republic of the Congo

 

2014: 8 million hectares by 2020

 

 

2,512 million USD

 

 

0.76 GtCO2 sequestered

 

More nations commit to fight climate change by restoring forests

 

Republic of the Congo

2 million hectares by 2030

628 million USD

0.19 GtCO2 sequestered

 

Burundi

2015:  2 million hectares by 2020

628 million USD

0.19 GtCO2 sequestered

Leaders pledge to restore additional 18 million hectares of critical landscapes as part of global target

Rwanda

2011: 2 million hectares by 2020

628 million USD

0.19 GtCO2 sequestered

Kigali Declaration on Forest Landscape Restoration in Africa

Total

34,56 million hectares

11,166 million USD

3,37GtCO2 sequestered

Restoration commitments from Africa push the Bonn Challenge beyond 100 million hectares

 

 

Please kindly download an IUCN Presentation on the state of art - Bonn Challenge

The commitments of the Central African countries represent 39.06% of the African commitments, 21.13% of the global commitments in the context of the Bonn challenges and 34.56% of the commitments of Africa in the framework of AFLR100 (African Forest Landscape Restoration Initiative).

 

 

Bonn Challenge - Pledges in Central Africa: Committed -  Economic benefits - climate benefits - Blogs and Media Links

 

 

Financing - 5 ways to unlock restoration finance

 

An extract from the article (Helen DingSofia FaruqiCaroline Gagné and Andrés Anchondo Ortega ;  January 31, 2018) … Find out more…

 

Trees are obviously good for the planet. What’s not so clear to most people — governments, NGOs, investors, the public — are their socioeconomic benefits. Trees are essential for the economy, our health and our wellbeing. Research shows that every $1 invested in restoring degraded land generates an estimated $7–$30 in economic benefits, including improved food production, carbon sequestration and water quality. Yet each year, deforestation and land degradation costs the world $6.3 trillion in lost ecosystem services such as agricultural products, recreational opportunities and clean air — equivalent to 8.3 percent of global GDP in 2016. Despite these clear costs and benefits, restoration receives only a tiny fraction of the funding it needs. That’s where governments come in.

 

A new WRI report, "Roots of Prosperity: The Economics and Finance of Restoring Land" looks at the barriers and opportunities to scale up finance in restoration.

 

Find out more Main barriers to scalling up Restoration Finance in WRI report  

 

Governments can design policies and strategies that help unlock restoration finance, including (see in WRI report):

 

  1. Monetizing environmental and social benefits :
  2. Shifting incentives from land degradation toward restoration
  3. Supporting risk mitigating mechanisms to attract the private sector
  4. Integrating restoration across many government ministries
  5. Quantifying the public benefits of restoration.

 

 

Note aux éditeurs

 

 

The Bonn Challenge is a global effort to bring 150 million hectares of deforested and degraded land into restoration by 2020 and 350 million hectares by 2030.

 

The Bonn Challenge is a global effort to bring 150 million hectares of the world’s deforested and degraded land into restoration by 2020, and 350 million hectares by 2030.It was launched in 2011 by the Government of Germany and IUCN, and later endorsed and extended by the New York Declaration on Forests at the 2014 UN Climate Summit. Underlying the Bonn Challenge is the forest landscape restoration (FLR) approach, which aims to restore ecological integrity at the same time as improving human well-being through multifunctional landscapes. The restoration of 150 million hectares of degraded and deforested lands in biomes around the world – in line with the FLR approach – will create approximately USD 84 billion per year in net benefits that could bring direct additional income opportunities for rural communities. About 90 per cent of this value is potentially tradable, meaning that it encompasses market-related benefits. Achieving the 350 million hectare goal will generate about USD170 billion per year in net benefits from watershed protection, improved crop yields and forest products, and could sequester up to 1.7 gigatonnes of carbon dioxide equivalent annually. The Bonn Challenge is not a new global commitment but rather a practical means of realizing many existing international commitments, including the CBD Aichi Target 15, the UNFCCC REDD+ goal, and the Rio+20 land degradation neutrality goal. It is an implementation vehicle for national priorities such as water and food security and rural development while contributing to the achievement of international climate change, biodiversity and land degradation commitments. For more information on the FLR approach, check out IUCN's new InfoFLR website. InfoFLR is your first stop for news, resources, and updates on forest landscape restoration (FLR) around the world. You’ll find country profiles highlighting domestic targets and policies related to restoration, gain access to tools including the Restoration Opportunities Assessment Methodology (ROAM), and catch up on global initiatives like the Bonn Challenge.

Find out more…

Why restore?

 

  • 2 billion hectares with restoration potential
  • Forest landscape restoration (FLR) is more than just “planting trees”
  • Rebuilding landscapes for essential ecosystem services
  • 150 Mha restored = US$ 85 bil/yr
  • Helps fulfil SDGs, UNFCCC, UNCCD, Aichi Targets

 

Find out more…

 

 

Potential benefits for Forests Restoration

Forest landscape restoration is the process of regaining ecological integrity and enhancing human well-being from degraded lands through the creation of multifaceted restored landscapes. There are many benefits of restoration, which can be balanced to serve the needs of the local, regional, or global community.  For information about the many options for restoring land, check out the Restoration options page. Find out more…

Read More…

 

 

 

Read also:

Example from Africa : How Ethiopia Is Slowing Climate Change By Reviving Its Forests – And Its Economy

 

Example from Europe: Financing Restoration of Ecosystems in the EU

 

 

How do we know when forest landscape restoration has been achieved?

The recent article by Dudley et al. (2018) in Restoration Ecology establishes that:

 “Successful monitoring systems for restoration need to consider three key elements: (1) the factors that caused degradation to occur (the status); (2) the changes to the ecosystem during restoration (the outcomes); and (3) the steps taken by the restoration project (the outputs).” Find out more…

 

 

With Drones, BioCarbon Engineering Shows Money Actually Can Grow on Trees

Climate change is a sprawling, complex problem. However we all know one very simple way to have a positive impact on climate change: plant more trees. Trees scrub pollution from the air, reduce erosion, improve water quality, provide homes for animals and insects, and enhance our lives in countless other ways. Find out more…

 

For more Information, please consult the following PDF Documents:

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